A Genius Invention That Turns Wind Into Cold Pressed Nut Oil: All You Need Are Nuts and a Breeze.

October 19 2020

A Genius Invention That Turns Wind Into Cold Pressed Nut Oil: All You Need Are Nuts and a Breeze.

A Genius Invention That Turns Wind Into Cold Pressed Nut Oil: All You Need Are Nuts and a Breeze.

This is part of our ongoing series, called DTL (that stands for Down to Learn), where we take deep dives into the odd, nuanced and mysterious world of sustainability. Each article in our series should give you a good icebreaker for your next Zoom, or perhaps even inspire you.

It's easy to take products at face value based on their packaging. (We're humans— taking things at face value seems to be what we do best, even if its... not the best.) But one of the nuances of sustainability is that the item in the plastic container is not necessarily as insidious as it seems— and the glass container is not automatically the better choice.

Plastic, for its many, many shortcomings (first and foremost, that every plastic item ever produced is still on earth, probably sitting in a landfill) exists for a reason. We need plastic for things like medical supplies. (Can you imagine a paper I.V.?) Until bioplastics and compostable plastics are as predictable and accessible as traditional plastics, we can't do away with plastic completely, nor should we. Plastic, for what it's worth, is much lighter to ship than the same products packaged in glass, which weigh a lot more. Heavier = more energy and higher carbon footprint when it comes to shipping. This is what makes talking sustainability tricky: there are butterfly effects we don't fully understand, and not everything is black and white, or good and bad. Most things are just grey.

Like the plastic vs. glass debate, one of the things we often overlook when deciding if a product meets our standards is the energy used to produce it. Example? Act + Acre hair care, while packaged in a plastic container, is cold processed, meaning it uses significantly less energy during manufacturing. We hadn't thought much about how much energy it takes to produce a conditioner, or how those products were heated, and we're probably not alone.

Dutch designer Dave Hakkens thought about cold pressing though, so much that he created the Windoil— a nut press that uses the power of the wind to press local nuts and seeds into a smooth oil. This is majorly impressive (to Jeff Nobbs's point, it takes a heck of a lot of nuts to make a bottle of oil.)

 

 

Image courtesy of Dave Hakkens.

Dave is a really creative thinker and pretty great at all things design and sustainability, so naturally he made sure that the leftover pulp could have a second life as feed for animals or plants.

Image courtesy of Dave Hakkens.

Dave even bottled his cold press nut and seed oil in bottles he'd saved from the kitchen, so the operation stayed zero waste.

Image courtesy of Dave Hakkens.

Tagged: DTL

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